Tag Archives: Donald Miller

Three Podcasts You Should Subscribe To

Podcasts are one of my favorite ways to learn. I love that they are free and on demand (you can listen and learn any time you want to). Here are 3 you should check out:

  • Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast
    In this podcast, you’ll get timely insights from Craig and his guests to make the most of your leadership potential, you’ll learn to solve problems in new ways, and you’ll be empowered to take your next steps in leading others.
  • The Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast
    Ever wish you could have a conversation with some of the top leaders in ministry today? Well, that’s what this leadership podcast is designed to bring you.
  • Building a Story Brand with Donald Miller
    This podcast will help you clarify your message and grow your business.

Your turn… What are some of your favorite podcasts?

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Three Resources from @DonaldMiller Designed to Help You Be Better at Relationships

As I mentioned in my previous post, Donald Miller has long been one of my favorite writers. Blue Like Jazz introduced me to Don while Searching For God Knows What introduced me to a better way of seeing Jesus. Don’s new book, Scary Close, shows us all how to be better at relationships. I had the privilege of reading an advanced copy of the book a couple of months ago (it resonated with my soul as I’ve always longed for greater intimacy but haven’t always been willing to take the risks to get there; I have the courage to now).

In addition to the new book (which you must read ASAP), Don and his team have created  3 online courses that will help you become better at relationships (2 are available now; the marriage one will be soon):

Pre-Marriage

Pre-Marriage

Marriage Coming Soon

Marriage

Parenting Buy Now

Parenting

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your turn… If you know someone who would be blessed by these resources, share them with them today and/or via Social Media.

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Three Powerful Truths from Scary Close by @DonaldMiller via @MichaelHyatt

A few weeks ago we were blessed to have Donald Miller and Bob Goff at our Men’s Conference. They inspired us to live a better story with our lives. Don has been one of my favorite writers for a number of years (I’ll highlight some of his resources in my next post). Today, I simply want to share 3 powerful truths from his latest book, Scary Close, via Michael Hyatt’s blog (if you don’t already follow Michael’s blog make sure you check it out today; he always shares great resources designed to help leaders leverage their influence).

Here are three powerful truths Scary Close can teach us (you can read the whole post here):

1. Shame Has More Power over Us Than We Realize

Somewhere in our lives we experience enough criticism or social pressure to believe that we don’t measure up. So we create a façade. If we can’t be worthy, we think, then at least our act can be worthy. Then when our act starts getting applause and validation, we learn to pass that off like it’s the real us.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve certainly done this. Don did too. It took a counselor to show him that people cannot connect with an act, even if it’s one as good as his.

Don says shame drives this whole process. We feel as if we have nothing to offer, we’re not good enough, or whatever version of that story we tell ourselves. To overcome that shame and the limits that come with it, we adopt a persona we hope will win approval and help us accomplish our goals.

I’ve seen leaders and bloggers do a lot of this. I’ve also seen that it’s unsustainable. In the case of Don it was crippling. He couldn’t maintain relationships, and his writing stalled.

2. Being Open Is Better Than Being Careful

This act is meant to protect ourselves, but Don discovered when he dropped the act people could finally connect with him and he could connect with them.

Isn’t that risky? Doesn’t that open ourselves up to getting hurt or rejected? Absolutely. But if you know anything about my approach to risk, you know that nothing good comes from staying inside our comfort zones. It’s when we venture outside that we find meaning, joy, and fulfillment.

Scary Close offers several examples of this in action, but one sticks with me. Don opened himself up on his Storyline blog to some significant criticism. Instead of retreating, he leaned into the discomfort and found the honesty liberating.

The new freedom unleashed his productivity. He started writing again—a lot. His blog traffic exploded along with his increased output. He even drafted a new book in just four months. That’s when Don decided it was better to be open than careful.

3. There are More Lifeguards Than Sharks

Criticism can make us afraid. If were a leader with a vision to share or blogger with something to say, it’s very easy to take criticism to heart and dial back our determination. But the real scandal is that we sometimes retreat before the darts start flying.

Sometimes all it takes is anticipating a negative reaction and we torque back our initiatives or soften our words.

I’m guilty of that, but as Don says, “For the most part, others aren’t out to get us.” We just need to step out and jump in the water knowing that their are more lifeguards than sharks. When we “dive into the unknown,” he says, “there [a]re very real dangers, but mostly rewards.”

This is similar to perceived scarcity and outrageous abundance. The world is richer and more welcoming than we know. But to protect ourselves from disappointment, we choose to disbelieve that. It’s hard to have our hopes dashed when we don’t hope for much.

But that’s a debilitating way to look at the world.

Criticism and social pressure are not the only things that matter.

If we were brave, we would say the things that were on our hearts. If we were brave, we would take our organizations the direction we want them to go. If we were brave, we would do many things differently than we do right now.

So why not be brave? I’m grateful to Don for pointing the way in Scary Close.

Your turn… If this post was helpful to you, take a moment and share it with someone else and/or on Social Media.

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Three Things That Create a Meaningful Life

The other day I shared 3 recent articles you should read. The one by Donald Miller focused on a prescription for a meaningful life by Viktor Frankl. Below is an excerpt from that article mentioning the 3 things that create a meaningful life:

Viktor Frankl spent most of his life studying the mystery of meaning, and amazingly, he came up with a prescription for how we can experience it ourselves.

His prescription was remarkably simple:

1 Have a project you’re working on that requires your unique skills and abilities. And preferably a project that helps others.
2 Share your experiences within the context of safe, loving relationships.
3 Find a redemptive perspective on your suffering and challenges.

 

Your turn… What are your thoughts on this prescription? Are your working on a project that requires your unique skills and abilities (for the good of others)? Are you sharing these experiences in the context of community? Have you found a redemptive perspective on your suffering and challenges?

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Three Recent Articles You Should Read

Here are 3 articles I came across recently that I think you would enjoy reading:

frankl_quote_full

 *Photo Credit: Oleh Slobodeniuk, Creative Commons via Storyline Blog

Your turn… What are some other articles you’ve seen recently that are worth taking a look at?

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Three Interesting Articles via @RELEVANT Magazine

I love browsing through the articles on the RELEVANT Magazine’s website. Here are 3 I think you’ll enjoy:

Your turn… What are some of your thoughts on these articles? What are some other articles you’ve enjoyed via @RELEVANT Magazine?

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Three Books by Donald Miller

Last week I shared Three Recent Articles by Donald Miller. Today, I simply want to highlight 3 of his books in more detail:

In Donald Miller’s early years, he was vaguely familiar with a distant God. But when he came to know Jesus Christ, he pursued the Christian life with great zeal. Within a few years he had a successful ministry that ultimately left him feeling empty, burned out, and, once again, far away from God. In this intimate, soul-searching account, Miller describes his remarkable journey back to a culturally relevant, infinitely loving God.

For anyone wondering if the Christian faith is still relevant in a postmodern culture.

For anyone thirsting for a genuine encounter with a God who is real.

For anyone yearning for a renewed sense of passion in  life.

Blue Like Jazz is a fresh and original perspective on life, love, and redemption.

In Searching for God Knows What, Donald Miller’s provocative and funny book, he shows readers that the greatest desire of every person is the desire for redemption. Every person is constantly seeking redemption (or at least the feeling of it) in his or her life, believing countless gospels that promise to fix the brokenness. Typically their pursuits include the desire for fulfilling relationships, successful careers, satisfying religious systems, status, and escape. Miller reveals how the inability to find redemption leads to chaotic relationships, self-hatred, the accumulation of meaningless material possessions, and a lack of inner peace. Readers will learn to identify in themselves and within others the universal desire for redemption. They will discover that the gospel of Jesus is the only way to find meaning in life and true redemption. Mature believers as well as seekers and new Christians will find themselves identifying with the narrative journey unfolded in the book, which is simply the pursuit of redemption.

After writing a successful memoir, Donald Miller’s life stalled. During what should have been the height of his success, he found himself unwilling to get out of bed, avoiding responsibility, even questioning the meaning of life. But when two movie producers proposed turning his memoir into a movie, he found himself launched into a new story filled with risk, possibility, beauty, and meaning.  A Million Miles in a Thousand Years chronicles Miller’s rare opportunity to edit his life into a great story, to reinvent himself so nobody shrugs their shoulders when the credits roll. Through heart-wrenching honesty and hilarious self-inspection, Donald Miller takes readers through the life that emerges when it turns from boring reality into meaningful narrative.

Miller goes from sleeping all day to riding his bike across America, from living in romantic daydreams to fearful encounters with love, from wasting his money to founding a nonprofit with a passionate cause. Guided by a host of outlandish but very real characters, Miller shows us how to get a second chance at life the first time around. A Million Miles in a Thousand Years is a rare celebration of the beauty of life.

Your turn… Share some thoughts on these books if you’ve read them.

 

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Three Posts Responding to Donald Miller

Earlier today I shared links to Three Recent Articles by Donald Miller. I thought you might also be interested in these 3 posts that respond to Donald Miller (not in a critical way but in a way that lifts up the importance of  church):

Your turn… What are some of your thoughts on these posts? Share some other posts you’ve seen on this topic.

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Three Recent Articles by Donald Miller

I’ve been a big fan of Donald Miller since I first read Blue Like Jazz several years ago (most of his recent work focuses on helping people live a better story with their life — see StoryLine for more details). I’ve read the rest of his books too and have learned a lot and been convicted, challenged, and encouraged by his writings — you can learn more about all of his books here (I’ll do another blog later highlighting his books but for now let me say that Searching For God Knows What and A Million Miles in a Thousand Years are two of my favorites).

The reason for today’s post is to point you to 3 of his recent posts that have generated lots of conversations and follow up posts in the past week or so (maybe you’ve read some of those). I thought you might enjoy taking a look at those 3 (in order):

Your turn… What are some of your thoughts on these articles? What are some other posts you’ve read as part of this conversation?

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